People Are Asking Travel Agents to Avoid Trump Hotels
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People Are Asking Travel Agents to Avoid Trump Hotels

Trump Hotels Naming

Anastassios Mentis/Getty Images

Evidence is growing that Donald Trump’s presidential campaign has adversely affected his businesses in the travel industry.

A new survey from Travel Weekly revealed that 61 percent of travel agents are recommending Trump properties less since he announced his presidential bid last year. Travel agents also reported that over half of their clientele have specifically asked not to be placed on a Trump property.

According to the 1,100 travel agents surveyed, the number of travelers specifically looking to avoid Trump hotels spiked immediately after the Billy Bush Access Hollywood hot microphone tapes leaked earlier this month—specifically among female travelers.

“The majority of travel agents are women, and travel decisions are made overwhelmingly by women,” Arnie Weissmann, editor in chief of Travel Weekly, said on CBS This Morning. About 20 percent of travel agents said that those looking to avoid a Trump hotel were more likely to be female.

However the reasons for avoiding a Trump property may go beyond just political affiliations. Trump properties have become a common site for vandalism and protests.

“It's not an environment that you would want to send your high-end clients to regardless of what your political beliefs may or may not be," Eric Reader, the senior vice president and chief operating officer of Connoisseur Travel in Washington, told CNN. "I wouldn't want to walk through a picket line and have to explain myself.”

Earlier this month, Trump Hotels announced that the launch of a new brand that will not carry the presidential candidate’s name, although they denied the name change had anything to do with the election.

While some news outlets and data analysts reported that there has been a drop in attendance at Trump properties ever since the man entered the race, the business refuted the claims, telling Travel + Leisure that the reports are not “an accurate representation” of performance.

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