Japan Might Convert Its Love Hotels for the Olympics
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Japan Might Convert Its Love Hotels for the Olympics

JAPAN - MARCH 01:  A couple walk past a love hotel in Tokyo's Shibuya district Monday, February 28, 2005.  (Photo by Andy Rain/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
ANDY RAIN

Sexy to family-friendly. 

Whenever the Olympics takes over a city, there’s a need for more transportation and infrastructure to sustain the influx of people. This also means more overnight accommodations for all the visitors. Japan’s solution to the problem? Convert their famous love hotels into regular ones.

That’s right. In time for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, the government is reportedly trying to turn couples-only hotels into ones open to the general public, at least during the Summer Olympics. Japan has approximately 10,000 love hotels with a 40% occupancy rate on weekdays, meaning they could provide a lot of available rooms for foreigners, especially families.

What does converting a love hotel into a regular hotel entail? Well first, according to local law, people under 18 aren’t allowed “amusement businesses,” the category that covers these hotels. This would prevent many families with young children from staying at the properties. Not to mention that families don’t exactly want to stay in a place where lovers have been shacking up. To address that issue, the government would increase funding to remodel the hotels for family use, including installing food facilities.

The need for rooms is a serious problem; 40 million tourists are expected in 2020, and experts say Japan doesn’t have enough places to accommodate everyone. That’s why, along with potentially converting the love hotels, the government has eased up on the rules allowing people to rent out rooms in their homes.

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