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Mike Pomranz
October 17, 2016

This story originally appeared on FWx.com.

Election Day is now exactly four weeks away, and while most of the nation is deep in the throes of Clinton versus Trump, plenty of pot-loving Californians have an even bigger ballot concern on their minds. On Tuesday, November 8, residents of the Golden State will also vote on Proposition 64 – known as the Adult Use of Marijuana Act – which could add the US’s most populous state to the growing number of places that allow legal recreational marijuana. 

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As the Los Angeles Times recently wrote, legalized pot could even have interesting ramifications for another huge (and intoxicating) California industry: wine. Marijuana-infused wine, also known as “green wine” (but legally described as a “tincture”), has been around in “its modern inception” since at least the 1970s, but it’s only moved out of its “relative secrecy” in recent years thanks to California’s medical marijuana dispensary system. According to the Times, the first of California’s “commercially available pot-infused wines” has been Canna Vine, described as “a high-end marijuana product that combines organically grown marijuana and biodynamically farmed grapes, made with the care and meticulousness of Opus One.” The price isn’t far off from Opus One either: “anywhere from $120 to $400 a half-bottle.” 

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With massive price tags like that, green wine could prove to be extremely lucrative for open-minded wineries if Proposition 64 passes (and the polls seem to be pointing that way). Louisa Sawyer-Lindquist of Verdad Wines who supplies the juice for Canna Vine is already pondering that future. “I have no idea what the market will be like for it, but whatever I make I want to be safe, made from pure ingredients and, hopefully, delicious,” she was quoted as saying. Meanwhile, Lisa Molyneux, the Santa Cruz dispensary owner who actually makes the wines, admits that mixing alcohol and marijuana could present additional legal hurdles but is already talking to her lawyers about what the future may hold. 

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Of course, all this depends on what happens in November, but maybe consider waiting a month before booking either your wine tasting vacation or your marijuana tourism trip. Pretty soon, you might be able to do both in one weekend.

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