Photo by DeAgostini/Getty Images

The pyramid is far different in construction from those in Giza.

Jess McHugh
April 03, 2017

An Egyptian excavation team has discovered remnants of a never-before-seen pyramid south of CairoAssociated Press reported.

The pyramid was located in the Dahshur royal necropolis, about 25 miles south of Cairo. The remains come from an interior corridor of the pyramid that dates from the 13th dynasty, making them approximately 3,700 years old, according to the same report.

Unlike the well-known Great Pyramids of Giza, this newly discovered pyramid was smooth-sided and may be one of the oldest of its kind.

The new pyramid, which has not yet been named, is located near the so-called Bent Pyramid of King Sneferu, according to head of the Ancient Egyptian Antiquities Sector, Mahmoud Afifi. The Bent Pyramid is a smooth-sided pyramid, and it was built in approximately 2,600 B.C., National Geographic reported.

It was nicknamed the Bent Pyramid for its sloping top, an effect that likely occurred after builders realized the lack of stability of the steep sides, according to National Geographic.

Sneferu commissioned the Bent Pyramid as a burial place for high-ranking courtiers after moving his court to the Dahshur province. He himself was not buried there, however.

Antiquities authorities in Egypt told the BBC that the pyramid remains were in good condition and that they would continue to excavate with the goal of discovering the full scope of the pyramid. The excavation team also found an alabaster block engraved with 10 lines of hieroglyphs.

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