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Magical Libraries Straight Out of Harry Potter
7 Libraries That Look Straight Out of Harry Potter
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  • Landmarks + Monuments

Magical Libraries Straight Out of Harry Potter

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Libraries like these will certainly inspire studying—or spell-casting. 

The Morgan Library in New York City, New York

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New York financier Pierpont Morgan built this library to house his vast collection of rare books, including copies of the works of his cohorts, Charles Dickens and Mark Twain—who personally gave his work to Morgan. The collection also includes some exceedingly rare illuminated manuscripts, including a Mainz Psalter that dates back to 1459. Morgan also collected drawings, prints, and artifacts gathered from around the world. To house the collection, he commissioned an Italian-inspired library near his home on the corner of 36th Street and Madison Avenue in New York City. After Morgan’s death in 1924, his son, J.P. Morgan, Jr., opened the doors of the museum and library to the public. A marble rotunda, a reading room with towering shelves of books, stained glass, and balconies give the library a grand and almost palatial manner. The library was expanded by architect Renzo Piano in 2006, adding to the library’s statliness.

7 Libraries That Look Straight Out of Harry Potter

Magical Libraries Straight Out of Harry Potter

The Morgan Library in New York City, New York

New York financier Pierpont Morgan built this library to house his vast collection of rare books, including copies of the works of his cohorts, Charles Dickens and Mark Twain—who personally gave his work to Morgan. The collection also includes some exceedingly rare illuminated manuscripts, including a Mainz Psalter that dates back to 1459. Morgan also collected drawings, prints, and artifacts gathered from around the world. To house the collection, he commissioned an Italian-inspired library near his home on the corner of 36th Street and Madison Avenue in New York City. After Morgan’s death in 1924, his son, J.P. Morgan, Jr., opened the doors of the museum and library to the public. A marble rotunda, a reading room with towering shelves of books, stained glass, and balconies give the library a grand and almost palatial manner. The library was expanded by architect Renzo Piano in 2006, adding to the library’s statliness.

Getty Images/Lonely Planet Images
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