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T+L Reports: Yohji's Dynasty

Ever since 1981, when the Japanese designer Yohji Yamamoto first showed his dark, intellectual, asymmetric clothes in Paris (and reminded us that dresses could be art), it's been impossible to keep fashion out of curators' hands. Twenty-four years after that eye-opening debut, Yamamoto is having his first retrospective, in—you guessed it—an art museum. More than 80 of the avant-garde master's most definitive designs, installed by Masao Nihei, Yamamoto's longtime collaborator, are now on display at Florence's Pitti Palace as part of the exhibition "Correspondences" (Piazza Pitti; 39-055/369-3407; through March 6). The show integrates such groundbreaking pieces as the designer's 1998 room-filling bridal gown—its sheer white skirt is more than 12 feet in diameter, and attendants hold aloft an enormous matching hat on bamboo poles—with 18th- and 19th-century paintings and sculpture from the museum's permanent collection. The dress may be no more wearable than the artworks surrounding it, but it's certainly no less awe-inspiring.
—Peter Webster

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