The World’s Most Expensive Hotel Spent $7 Million on Each Room
  1. T+L
  2. Hotels + Resorts
  3. China

The World’s Most Expensive Hotel Spent $7 Million on Each Room

Courtesy of The 13
Courtesy of The 13
Courtesy of The 13
Courtesy of The 13

The $1.4 billion hotel in Macau, China opens this summer.

Located in China’s moneyed gambling hot spot, Macau, The 13 is poised to become the world’s most expensive hotel, having cost its investors some $1.4 billion to bring to life. Details, released last week, reveal a mind-blowing Baroque-style property with suites sprawling at 30,000 square feet a piece.

The 200-villa hotel, created by Chinese billionaire Stephen Hung, is slated to open this summer. On offer: accommodations up to 11 times larger than the average American home, 24-hour butler service, and a fleet of custom Rolls-Royce Phantoms to chauffeur guests to the casinos and other hot spots.

Courtesy of The 13
Courtesy of The 13

In all, it breaks down to some $7 million spent on each available villa.

"This was a labor of love,” Hung said in a statement. “The team and I put every ounce of creativity and passion we had into this project to ensure every detail was perfect. Our guests, I believe, will find the result truly remarkable and beyond anything they have previously experienced."

Louis X111 Holdings, the parent company of the hotel, unleashed images of what they deem the entry-level room: the one-bedroom Villa du Comte. Guests enter through gold doors from their private elevator. Beyond, there’s a living room outfitted with neoclassical furniture, paintings, fireplaces, and Roman-style. The styling continues; each room comes with its own Roman bath with space for eight to sit under a crystal chandelier and vaulted ceilings.

The 13
Courtesy of The 13

Aside from the lavish rooms, The 13 will also have an invitation-only L’Atelier where guests can buy “couture, bespoke and limited-edition products” from luxury brands. It will also be home to the only other location of L’Ambroisie, a three-Michelin star restaurant in Paris.

Though many hotels avoid the number 13 and even skip numbering the floor on elevators, Hung has embraced the unlucky numeral. “As the business and the brand have developed, we felt that the name ‘The 13’ most accurately reflected our Macau hotel’s combination of Baroque inspiration and contemporary accents,” he added. “Thirteen is my lucky number and the new name along with the new logo fit perfectly with my vision. There is a hint of tradition while also suggesting a chic and fun edginess.”

Sponsored Content
Explore More
More from T+L
Advertisement
Advertisement