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T+L's Definitive Guide to Rio de Janeiro

201401-a-rio-de-janeiro

Photo: David Nicolas

See + Do

Five essential stops for soaking up Brazilian culture.

Casa Daros: Zurich-based art collector Ruth Schmidheiny just unveiled her 1,200-piece Latin American art collection in Botafogo following a six-year renovation of the 1866 building. Inside are works from more than 100 talents, including native sculptor Iole de Freitas and Argentine kinetic artist Julio Le Parc.

Maracanã Stadium: Few activities in Rio can rival the thrill of watching a match at Brazil’s national soccer stadium—a symbol of the country’s futebol-centric culture—which reopened in June after a $500 million refurbishment. Originally built for the 1950 World Cup, the Maracanã will host the tournament’s championship game for the second time this year. Guided tours are available on non–game days.

Museu De Arte Do Rio: Rio’s newest art museum is the anchor of the Port district revitalization project. Eight exhibition halls in the 20th-century palace feature rotating shows—watercolors of Sugarloaf Mountain; a colorful brick model of Rio’s favelas—that celebrate the city’s scenery and diversity, while art workshops are held in the glass-walled annex.

São Bento Monastery: Behind the 17th-century monastery’s austere façade, you’ll find such treasures as colonial-era panels, massive silver chandeliers, and an intricately carved, gold-plated altar. Don’t miss Sunday morning Mass, when resident monks sing Gregorian chant.

Teleférico Do Complexo Do Alemão: Take a cable car ride at dusk to see Rio’s curiously picturesque shantytowns, with their flickering lanterns and gas lamps.

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