Raul Barreneche
September 16, 2009

British architect David Chipperfield’s nimble rebuilding of the Neues Museum was such a feat of renovation and reconstruction that the city admitted the public to the empty building for several days last March to show off the achievement. After 12 years of painstaking work, the Neoclassical structure reopens this month with one of the world’s top collections of Egyptian art and a singular beauty, the bust of Nefertiti.

Neues Museum

British architect David Chipperfield’s nimble rebuilding of the Neues Museum was such a feat of renovation and reconstruction that the city admitted the public to the empty building for several days in March 2009 to show off the achievement. After 12 years of painstaking work, the Neoclassical structure reopens with one of the world’s top collections of Egyptian art and a singular beauty, the bust of Nefertiti. The newly renovated Neues Museum in Berlin incorporates traces of the building’s history in brilliantly understated fashion—architect David Chipperfield’s serene galleries inhabit and expand a grand 19th-century building so badly damaged during World War II that East German authorities more or less abandoned the place. Some 60 years later, the museum’s frescoes, columns, and brickwork have been given new life—solemn backdrops for an extraordinary collection of antiquities.

You May Like