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T+L Reports: Renaissance Men

Despite its radical break from the aesthetic norms of the Renaissance, El Greco's art made his contemporaries gush. He introduced such "an extravagant style that to this day nothing has been seen to equal it," said the 17th-century Spanish critic José Martínez. The assessment still holds true today. In the first major retrospective dedicated to the artist in more than 20 years, New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art presents the other-worldly icons, landscapes, and portraits that have influenced generations of artists, from Diego Velázquez to Jackson Pollock (October 7- January 11). Meanwhile, an exhibition at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts examines the career of the 17th-century master Rembrandt, bringing together 150 of his etchings—rarely exhibited in the U.S.—with 55 of his better-known paintings and drawings. "Rembrandt's Journey" chronicles the Dutchartist's fascination with a variety of media and genres, ranging from biblical narratives to nude portraiture to gritty depictions of daily life (October 26-January 18).
—James McWilliams

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