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Letters: Bermuda Booster, Greek Drama, True Vermont

Bermuda Booster
Padgett Powell's article on my favorite island-- 34 trips so far-- is a well-written piece of hyperbole [World's Best Awards, September]. In fact, there are guns on Bermuda (not legally, of course); there is crime (some of it petty crime against tourists); there are taxes, tariffs, and surcharges (but no income tax); and there is poverty (though not much). Yet Bermuda is a sanctuary for those who have discovered its charms, who love it without having to pretend that it's perfect. I hope T&L's number-one rating will encourage others to try it.
John R. Linnell
New Gloucester, Maine

Greek Drama
Our family recently booked into the Kivotos Clubhotel on Mykonos following your review ["Aegean Ease," May 1996]. From the moment we arrived-- and were not met at the airport, as promised-- we were thoroughly disappointed. Your contributor described Kivotos as a place of "unpretentious luxury." Pretensions are all the hotel had.
Firdaus J. Kharas
Nepean, Ont.

Good Fun
Keep those humor stories coming. I loved the one by NPR commentator David Sedaris ["The Ashtray Is on the Table Today," May] as well as Michael Lewis's on the troubles of traveling in Norway ["Where the Midnight Sun Didn't Shine," June], and I certainly wouldn't mind a few more.
Ethel George
El Cajon, Calif.

Inn Love in Washington
I got the name of a B&B on Orcas Island from your April '96 issue ["The Island Inns of Washington State"]. Though I've stayed at many B&B's, I was never treated as regally as at the WindSong. After I reserved a room, I called the owner, Sam Raines, to see if I could arrive a day early. He couldn't accommodate me, but he found four places that could. The morning I left the WindSong to catch an early ferry, Sam packed me fresh-squeezed orange juice and a hunk of his homemade coffee cake. I even got a farewell hug at 5:30 a.m.
Ruth Ann Gigax
Carmel, Ind.

True Vermont
Peter Jon Lindberg must have arrived after sundown if his only impression of the town of West Dover is "just a strip of real estate offices" ["The Great Inns of Vermont," August]. In fact, West Dover has one of the few remaining unspoiled historic districts in New England. (It was put on the National Register of Historic Places in 1985.) As Mr. Lindberg states, West Dover is not a typical Vermont village-- a fact we are quite proud of, since authentic Vermont villages are a rarity.
Monique R. Phelan
West Dover Inn
West Dover, Vt.

New Frontiers
As a subscriber for many years, I'd like to request that you focus on more exotic destinations. It's wonderful to read about Paris (I lived there for five years), London is super (my home was in Chelsea), and Munich is fascinating (especially living 50 meters from the Rathaus), but I now travel frequently for business in the Baltics, Russia, and Latin America. A significant portion of your readers must have similar itineraries.
Gary A. Gustafson
New York, N.Y.

Letters to the editor should be addressed: Letters, Travel & Leisure, 1120 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10036; fax 800/926-1748. They can also be sent via E-mail to LettersTL@amexpub.com. Letters chosen for publication may be edited for clarity and space limitations.

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