© Mikael Buck / Sony
December 08, 2015

We knew Iceland was beautiful above ground, but those who get a peek beneath its surface are in for a true treat. The Vatna Glacier is the largest in Iceland, covering eight percent of the country. It's constantly on the move—meaning no shot of the ice and its caves are ever going to look the same. British photographer Mikael Buck recently took a dive into Vatna's caverns with a camera to document the otherworldly ice formations.

© Mikael Buck / Sony

The photos you see above and below didn't require any sort of additional lighting equipment—the detail is all picked up from the light shining through the ice and water. That being said, Buck did get a little help from his camera, which came equipped with a back-illuminated, full-frame sensor and ultra-high resolution and light sensitivity. 

© Mikael Buck / Sony

© Mikael Buck / Sony

Explorers only have a couple of weeks with each glacial adjustment before everything shifts again. Buck was able to locate entirely new cave systems using a new sensor technology from Sony—the same features responsible for lighting up ultra-low light scenes. For more of Buck's photography, head to his photography website.

© Mikael Buck / Sony

Erika Owen is the Audience Engagement Editor at Travel + Leisure. Follow her on Twitter and Instagram at @erikaraeowen.

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