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Revisiting Emilia-Romagna

SWEET SPOTS There's no better way to end a meal than to go to one of the city's ice cream or chocolate shops. Run by three brothers, Gelatauro (98 Via San Vitale; 39-051/230-049) is gaining international attention for its organic gelato, made with oranges from their grove in Calabria, as well as herbs like jasmine and bergamot—even Umberto Eco has come in for a taste. • The owners of La Sorbetteria Castiglione (44 Via Castiglione; 39-051/233-257) named its flavors after the younger members of their family. Top sellers include Michelangelo (age 8; praline almond), Edoardo (age 6; mascarpone with caramelized pine nuts), and Dolce Karin (age 17; white chocolate and hazelnut crunch). Looking for a souvenir?Pick up a chocolate replica of the city's iconic Due Torri from their confectionery shop next door. • Famous for the gianduja chocolate their ancestors made for the Princes of Savoy, the husband-and-wife team running Roccati (17A Via Clavature; 39-051/261-964) moved their shop from Trentino to the quadrilateral eight years ago. People stop in their tracks to watch the open-air laboratory, which entices them to purchase a Cognac-filled chocolate or two.

CULTURE SCENE Bologna's esteemed academic history has a cultural one to match. In 1770, Mozart was only 14 years old when he earned a diploma in composition at the Accademia Filarmonica di Bologna (13 Via Guerrazzi; 39-051/222-997; www.accademiafilarmonica.it). Today, classical music lovers gather in Mozart Hall, near the quadrilateral, for performances of works by Haydn, Brahms, and Vivaldi. • During the 1970's, Luciano Pavarotti frequently traveled from his home in Modena to head operas at the 1763 landmark Teatro Comunale (1 Largo Respighi; 39-051/529-999; www.comunalebollogna.it). Verdi's Macbeth and Rossini's Elisabetta, regina d'Inghilterra are on this year's lineup. • The 15th-century Palazzo Poggi Museum (33 Via Zamboni; 39-051/209-9398; www.unibo.it/musei/palazzopoggi) displays wax models and surgical tools used by medical students during the Renaissance to study the human body. And on summer nights, visitors can go to the Sala della Torretta room to survey the stars through the museum's telescope. • Bologna's vast student population creates a market for both big-budget and independent films, and every night in July and August the Cineteca di Bologna (72 Via Riva di Reno; 39-051/219-4831; www.cinetecadibologna.it) shows past and present favorites—such as Gillo Pontecorvo's Battle of Algiers and Pedro Almodóvar's Talk to Her—on a large outdoor screen in Piazza Maggiore. • After watching a movie, head to the nearby Nu Lounge Bar (6 Via de' Musei; 39-051/222-532), where fashionable thirtysomethings catch up over Calabrian green olives, steak tartare, and dry vodka martinis.

JANE BILLS is a former editor at Travel + Leisure.

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