With more than 40 restaurants and food shops, and 100 regional purveyors at the weekend farmers’ market, the Ferry Building has changed the way locals and visitors alike eat in the City by the Bay. Francine Maroukian picks some standouts

April 09, 2009

Hog Island Oyster Co. This Tomales Bay grower serves up to seven varieties—from sweet Kumamotos to briny French Hogs—at the counter.

Acme Bread Co. Former Chez Panisse busboy Steve Sullivan opened the cult favorite in Berkeley in 1983. Twenty-five kinds of irresistible breads are on offer at this waterfront outpost.

Cowgirl Creamery A selection of artisanal and farmstead cheeses, including Cowgirl’s own stellar cow’s-milk triple cream, Red Hawk.

Boulette’s Larder The big farm table, adjacent to the open kitchen, and a custom spice-blending station draw San Franciscans to this culinary studio.

Out the Door The takeout arm of Charles Phan’s popular Vietnamese restaurant, the Slanted Door—sure beats trying to score a reservation.

Miette Patisserie Handcrafted cakes and ethereal Parisian macarons in six flavors (they sell more than 3,000 a week), all made from locally grown ingredients.

Mcevoy Ranch A showcase for the peppery, unfiltered olive oil made by former reporter Nan McEvoy, whose grandfather founded the San Francisco Chronicle.

Far-west Fungi Offers some 50 varieties of mushrooms foraged from Moss Landing, including Candy Caps, Puffballs, and Fairy Rings.

The Ferry Building The Embarcadero; 415/693-0996; www.ferrybuildingmarketplace.com; open daily 10–6.

Ferry Building Marketplace

Even if you miss the famed farmers’ market held here every Saturday, there are plenty of other reasons to swing by the beautifully refurbished 1898 Ferry Building. The waterfront complex contains more than 40 gourmet shops and snack counters. Among the offerings are divine chocolate sablées at Miette Patisserie, fresh-baked sourdough levain from Acme Bread, Mt. Tam triple-cream cheese at Cowgirl Creamery, and harvest-time Olio Nuovo at McEvoy Ranch (or buy an olive sapling and grow your own). If you’re weighed down, a handwoven basket from The Gardener should help you carry it all. 

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