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T+L Reports: Exhibitions

Originally scheduled for last spring, "Matthew Barney: The Cremaster Cycle" finally arrives at New York's Guggenheim Museum. The international art star's five-part film project, accompanied by related sculptures, drawings, and photographs, pays tribute to Hollywood film history and to the previously unsung cremaster muscle, which here becomes a metaphor for masculinity and metamorphosis (Feb. 21-June 11). • Sketches, engineering plans, studies of animals, plants, and weaponry—what more could an exhibition devoted entirely to the drawings of Leonardo da Vinci offer?Plenty: the sublime unfinished painting Saint Jerome Praying in the Wilderness, which normally hangs in the Vatican, as well as a small selection of work by Leonardo's teacher, contemporaries, and pupils. "Leonardo da Vinci, Master Draftsman," at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art, has all the Renaissance breadth of the master (through March 30). • More than a clever pun on a legendary 1969 exhibition, the Walker Art Center's "How Latitudes Become Forms: Art in a Global Age," in Minneapolis, attempts to define a seismic shift toward hip globalism. The survey includes installations, videos, wall paintings—and even a soy sauce drawing—by 27 emerging artists from seven countries (Feb. 9-May 4). • Straddling two centuries, "Édouard Vuillard," at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., brings together some prints, drawings, photographs, theater programs, ceramics, and wonderful, decorative folding screens. It also re-creates the quintessentially Parisian interiors for which Vuillard is celebrated, among them his monumental Public Gardens, reuniting eight of nine decorative panels that were created for a private salon in 1894 and later dispersed at auction (through April 20). • At London's Tate Museum, German painter Max Beckmann, whose work was informed by three of the 20th century's major artistic movements— Expressionism, New Objectivity, and Cubism—yet somehow transcended them all, gets his first retrospective since 1965. Organized with the Centre Pompidou, the show plumbs the depths of this artist's dark pictorial world (Feb. 12-May 5).

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