If You Want to Stay at this California Hotel, Make Sure Your Dog can Vouch for You
  1. T+L
  2. Trip Ideas

If You Want to Stay at this California Hotel, Make Sure Your Dog can Vouch for You

Welcomed more than Humans
Getty Images

Dogs are always welcome at The Cartwright Hotel.

Paws for thought—when’s the last time you heard about a Chihuahua getting so drunk on vacation that they destroyed the hotel furniture? Or what about when Penelope the pug slipped a couple towels in her purse from maid-service? These are just two of many hard-hitting points The Cartwright Hotel in San Francisco posed to its guests recently.

The notice, which is framed and posted by the hotel’s main elevator bank, is the perfect place for guests to get a sense of the laid back, fun-loving nature of this California locale. “People laugh every time they see it,” The Cartwright’s general manager Steven Viscio told T+L. “People read it on the way up to their room and they always get a kick out of it.”

 “Dogs are welcome in this hotel,” is definitely one of the more cunning ways to address their pet-friendly policy:

“We have never had a dog that smoked in bed and set fire to blankets. We never had a dog that stole our towels or played the TV too loud, or had a noisy flight with his travelling companion. We never had a dog that got drunk and broke up the furniture. So if your dog can vouch for you, you're welcome too.”

The Cartwright is just one of many hotels taking a more progressive stance on pet-friendly accommodations.

Kimpton Hotels are not only pet-friendly, they also don’t charge a pet fee and even throw in amenities such as pet beds, a list of nearby pet-friendly restaurants and parks, and a complimentary nightly pet-friendly wine reception meet and greet. Lowes Hotels offer a program called Loews Loves Pets, where pet-toting guests receive welcome gifts including a nametag, bowl, and special treats upon check-in.

According to a 2014 survey by the American Hotel & Lodging, hotels are making a more concerted effort to better accommodate travelers with pets in tow. A report by Reuters found sixty percent of U.S. hotels now accept pets, up from 50 percent in 2006.

For a definitive guide for how to travel with your pet or if you want to check out some of the world’s cutest hotel dogs look no further.

In the meantime, if you happen to be traveling to San Francisco with your pet anytime soon, make sure they can vouch for you. Otherwise you might be staying in the doghouse.

Michelle Gross is a Freelance Producer at Travel + LeisureFollow her on Twitter and Instagram at @mtothegnyc

Sponsored Content
More from T+L
Advertisement
Advertisement