© Allora & Calzadilla. Photo by Myritza Castillo. Courtesy Dia Art Foundation, New York
Melissa Locker

Artist Dan Flavin is known for his incredible light installations. So naturally, artists Jennifer Allora and Guillermo Calzadilla are sticking his work where the sun don’t shine. Specifically, a cave in Puerto Rico.

While putting a modern minimalist masterpiece in a cave might sound nuts—and, admitedly Flavin's estate is less than pleased with the situationAllora and Calzadilla aren't crazy. The artistic duo represented the United States at the Venice Biennale, and are used to thinking way outside the box, or in this case, the art gallery.

Related: Things to do in Puerto Rico

The piece was commissioned by the New York-based Dia Art Foundation and Para La Naturaleza, a non-profit conservation organization based in Puerto Rico, and has been aptly titled Puerto Rican Light (Cueva Vientos).

For the exhibition, Allora and Calzadilla are turning Flavin’s work, Puerto Rican Light (to Jeanie Blake) (1965), which is made out of pink, yellow and red fluorescent light bulbs, into a site-specific installation inside a natural limestone cave near the southern coast of Puerto Rico. Solar panels at the mouth of the cave will keep Flavin’s work glowing for the duration of the show.

Allora and Calzadilla’s installation opens on September 23 and will be accessible to the public for the next two years, closing on September 23, 2017. Online reservations are available here. To see the work in situ, be prepared to hoof it, though: The hike to the cave takes about two hours.

If you can’t make it to a cave in Puerto Rico any time soon—or maintain an ardent anti-hiking stance—there are easier places to see Flavin’s work, including a new installation that is due to open at Dia:Beacon in New York’s Hudson Valley in October.

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