Bogotá, Colombia, Is Having a Burger Boom
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Bogotá, Colombia, Is Having a Burger Boom

La Xarcuteria
Courtesy of La Xarcuteria

Eating burgers in Bogotá, Colombia, isn’t as counterintuitive as it seems. Turns out, the city is going through an American food boom, with burgers, barbecue and bacon appearing on menus all over town. All burgers are not created equal, though, so we went tasting to determine who serves the best three in the city.

Burger Kill

A third Burger Kill is opening this month, a testament to the growing love that Bogotá has for these thick and juicy old-school-style burgers. The picnic-table seating and great value prices (burgers, with fries and soda, cost $7-$10) draw a crowd, as do their four beef blends: classic, jalapeño, three cheese and Parmesan-bacon. Burgers come in two sizes, the BurgerKill and the BigKill. The most popular? The BigKill stuffed with Parmesan and bacon bits.

Gordo

Daniel Castaño is at the forefront of the newly international Bogotá food scene, and his Gordo is a tribute to the years he spent in New York. The “Brooklyn Bar & Restaurant” serves everything from pork belly tater tots to fried pickles, but it’s the burgers ($7) that are the standout. Made from a house-ground blend of meats, they’re topped with organic tomatoes grown especially for Gordo on a local farm, house-made kosher dill pickles and hard-to-find imported condiments, like Heinz ketchup, Gulden’s mustard and Kewpie mayo from Japan.

La Xarcuteria

The menu at this chic gastropub has five different crowd-pleasing burgers ($9-$10; it’s packed at lunchtime with business people, so arrive early). The California comes topped with guacamole, the Mushroom Burger with mushrooms, grilled onions and Swiss cheese, and the BBQ Burger with sweet or spicy sauce and pickles—but all are made from a blend of varied cuts of meats ground daily. The bacon in the best-selling Bacon Cheeseburger (pictured) is cured and smoked in-house, the mayo is homemade, too, and the burgers are beautifully cooked: be prepared for juice dribbling down your chin. Although the website says they stay open until midnight, they sometimes close early if there aren’t many customers, so call ahead if you’re in the mood for late-night dining.

Nell McShane Wulfhart is based in Uruguay, and writes about South America for Travel + Leisure. Follow her on Twitter at @nellmwulfhart.

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