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Beyond Wing Tips

greenbacks and green space: a key to the financial district

1 Wall Street (1931) Currently home to the Bank of New York. The beautiful reception hall is covered from floor to ceiling in screaming red, orange, and gold Art Deco mosaics.
Woolworth Building (1913) 233 Broadway. The original Cathedral of Commerce, with vaulted ceilings, mosaics, and terrific gargoyles.
70 Pine Street (1932) The onetime Cities Service Tower, now headquarters of the American International Group. Don't miss the lobby, a showcase of rippling marble and aluminum trim.
25 Broadway (1921) Formerly the Cunard Building. Today the great hall is used as a post office; murals depict the history of seafaring.
Trinity Church (1846) Broadway at Wall St.; 212/602-0872. This Gothic Revival landmark is the third Trinity Church on the same site. Astonishingly tranquil inside. The churchyard's 17th- and 18th-century gravestones make good reading.
St. Paul's Chapel (1766) Broadway at Fulton St.; 212/602-0872. Manhattan's oldest public building still looks like the country church it once was. George Washington's pew remains, although its furnishings and canopy are long gone.
Skyscraper Museum 16 Wall St.; 212/968-1961. May relocate this fall, so call ahead.
Federal Reserve Bank of New York 33 Liberty St.; 212/720-6130. Guided tours (free; reserve at least two weeks in advance) take in the gold vaults, the computerized trading room, and a museum. Great ironwork inside and out.
New York Stock Exchange 20 Broad St.; 212/656-5165. The viewing gallery above the floor is open weekdays from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Mercantile Exchange 1 North End Ave. (west of the World Financial Center); 212/299-2000. Two trading floors and a clever little museum are open to the public.
Century 21 22 Cortlandt St.; 212/227-9092. Chaos theory for shoppers.
Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian In the old U.S. Custom House, 1 Bowling Green; 212/514-3700. Sophisticated exhibitions of American Indian culture, and two great gift shops. Check out the Custom House's beautiful rotunda.
Museum of American Financial History 28 Broadway; 212/908-4110. Artifacts of life on Wall Street, including a special exhibition, "Rockefeller Rediscovered." Call about special September events such as "Culinary Riches of the Robber Barons," a food tour.
Museum of Jewish Heritage 18 First Place; 212/509-6130. A six-sided building filled with materials and literature documenting the history of European Jewish culture before Hitler, life during the Third Reich, and Judaism after the war.
South Street Seaport Museum 12-14 Fulton St.; 212/748-8600. The best thing at the seaport. A $6 fee gives you access to three historic ships and the museum's galleries.
14 Wall Street Restaurant 14 Wall St.; 212/233-2780; dinner for two $70. Stunning views are the highlight of this new restaurant in what was once J. P. Morgan's pied-À-terre. Go for an elegant breakfast or evening drinks.
American Park Restaurant Battery Park; 212/809-5508; dinner for two $100. Excellent seafood (especially the crab salad wrapped in nori), great oysters, and uninterrupted views of the harbor.
Tiffin 18 Murray St.; 212/791-3511; lunch for two $18. Indian vegetarian prix fixe meals. Order baingan bharra tori kadhi—zucchini stuffed with roasted eggplant in a yogurt-and-chickpea sauce.
Mangia 40 Wall St.; 212/425-4040; lunch for two $25. The most beautiful salad bar on earth: try roasted vegetables, filet mignon salad, or a "pizzette" with fennel and butternut squash.
Carmine's 140 Beekman St.; 212/962-8606; dinner for two $35. This atmospheric Italian seafood joint has been here since 1903. Great for green-pea clam chowder and steamed lobster.
Bayard's 1 Hanover Square; 212/514-9454; dinner for two $120. Specialties include Hudson Valley foie gras, and Chilean sea bass with a saffron-and-orange broth.
Fraunces Tavern Restaurant 54 Pearl St.; 212/269-0144; breakfast for two $30. The food at this cozy, threadbare, Colonial-era outpost was probably better in Washington's day.
Delmonico's 56 Beaver St.; 212/509-1144; dinner for two $80. Italian food, steak, and power brokers in a handsome historic (1838) dining room. Stop into the dark, woody bar for a hamburger or a dozen oysters.
Wall Street Kitchen & Bar 70 Broad St.; 212/797-7070; dinner for two $40. A popular after-work spot for Wall Streeters, especially on Thursdays. Impressive selection of wines by the glass and draught beers. Simple American menu.
Wild Blue 1 World Trade Center, 107th floor; 212/524-7107; dinner for two $70. A casual New American restaurant atop the city's tallest building. The adjacent Greatest Bar on Earth (212/524-7000) has live music most nights and swing bands on weekends; good for sushi and a sunset martini.
Edward Moran Bar & Grill 4 World Financial Center; 212/945-2255; dinner for two $25. On warm weeknights the plaza outside this joint fills up with hundreds of traders drinking longnecks and eating from troughs of calamari and buffalo wings. Interesting anthropological site.
Regent Wall Street 55 Wall St.; 212/845-8600; opening late 1999. The theme at this new luxury hotel is big: gargantuan banquet hall; rooms larger than most New York apartments; "deep-soaking" bathtubs; giant TV's hidden inside massive armoires. The restaurant will have a terrace bar overlooking Wall Street.
Holiday Inn 15 Gold St.; 800/465-4329 or 212/232-7800; doubles from $159. Opened in June. Rooms feature comfy chairs, big desks, and information-age wiring—T-1 lines, infrared keyboards, guest E-mail—plus dictionaries and paper clips.
Millenium Hilton 55 Church St.; 212/693-2001; doubles from $135. Across the street from the World Trade Center, with sweeping views from the highest floors. Good weekend rates.
Wall Street Inn 9 S. William St.; 877/747-1500 or 212/747-1500; doubles $175-$500. A 46-room "B&B"—the neighborhood's first—with plenty of extras (health club, business center, marble baths), housed in a 19th-century building.
Robert F. Wagner Jr. Park Terrific views of the harbor, the Statue of Liberty, and Ellis Island.
Bowling Green The city's first park, founded in 1733 and relandscaped in 1978.

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