Artist and writer Maira Kalman illustrates the many pleasures of the in-room hotel breakfast.

May 10, 2010

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Claridge's

A classic that’s as popular now as it was in the 20’s, this spot in chichi Mayfair is the epitome of elegance. The Art Deco details are sublime, as is the pricey afternoon tea (though it’s as much a people-watching exercise as an indulgent experience). Big draws here are the Michelin-starred Gordon Ramsay restaurant (the city’s toughest booking) and the gorgeous Fumoir bar, which harks back to the days of flapper girls and jazz piano. Add neo-Art Deco suites fashioned by David Linley, and a stay here is like stepping back into the long-lost glamorous days of travel.

The Peninsula Beijing

The Peninsula exudes old-world glamour with features like afternoon tea, tastefully-appointed rooms and suites, a luxurious spa that uses skincare products by luxury brand Biologique Recherche, and bellhops in crisp white uniforms. Its location in Wangfujing puts it close to tourist attractions like Tian’anmen Square, Donghuamen Night Market, and the Forbidden City.

The Standard, New York

André Balazs understands that stellar views in New York City have less to do with the height of a building than with its context. The perennial hotelier to the hip—and in this case, hip and budget-conscious—has opened his fourth Standard hotel, on a Meatpacking District site surrounded by low-lying warehouses. The result: practically every room has stunning skyline or Hudson River vistas. Vast swaths of glass work to that end. At full operation later this year, the hotel will have two restaurants and five bars (don’t miss the sunset views from the one on the 18th floor), and the building straddles the High Line, the freight railway that’s being turned into a much-hyped city park.

 

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