Frank Rothe
Molly McArdle
October 22, 2015

Who knew time travel was so easy? Just three hours north of New York City, or a fifteen minute cab ride from downtown Albany (and its Amtrak station), is Troy, New York: a beautifully preserved Hudson River Valley town that feels like a place out of time. It looks much like it did in the late 19th-century, and boasts one of the best preserved downtowns in the United States. The small town (and former industrial powerhouse) has over a dozen Tiffany windows (one in their beaux-arts public library), a frescoed French-Renaissance concert hall, and a wealth of stunning, affordable, antiques. It's no wonder that when Martin Scorsese filmed novelist Edith Warton's Gilded Age-masterpiece, The Age of Innocence, he picked Troy as his backdrop. Best of all? It's full of charming and well-stocked antique stores. Drop in to take home your own piece of history.

The Antiques Warehouse

This 11,000 square foot retail space makes good on its name. It's full of furnishings large and small from just about every period—a beautiful mid-century couch sits next to a delicate Victorian vanity. With rugs, lighting, art, and an upholstery service to boot, there's not much you can't find here.

Bluebird Décor

Bluebird Décor combines choice vintage items with inspired new pieces: think antique whiskey boxes full of succulents, Art Deco radios repurposed with bluetooth and USB ports, and rich green armchairs fronting wooly wall-hangings made by the shop-owner, (and textile artist) Nicolle Broughton.

Funcycled

Looking for a fresh take on old furniture? Funcycled updates the durability and beautiful lines of vintage furnishings with their own whimsical reimagining. These antique pieces are refinished in sweet and sophisticated ways. Our favorite examples? A midcentury credenza that's been given graphic back panels and a fresh mint coat and a 1920s hutch that's gone teal.

Modern on the Hudson

This by-appointment-only showroom is conveniently located next to The Trojan Horse in a building once occupied by department store Frear's Cash Bazaar, which closed in the 1950s. As its name suggest, this store's focus is the same period: midcentury modern furnishings. With its impeccable selection, a visit is worth the extra phone call.

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Shabadashery

Tucked away on a quiet block of Second Street is this small but eclectic selection of furniture, dishware, and decor—among several other things. Who doesn't need a pair of 1896 mother-of-pearl opera glasses?

The Trojan Horse

The showroom of The Trojan Horse, located on the corner of Third and River Street, is big, bright, and lovely. Filled with objects large and small—all in excellent condition—it can feel like you've wandered into crowded (but tidy) Victorian mansion.

Weathered Wood

This antique shop takes a spin on old and new. The objects—gnarly light fixtures, knobby coat racks—are newly made, but they're constructed enitrely from Hudson River driftwood.

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