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T+L Reports: All That Glitters

The bejeweling habits of high society are fodder for three shows. In New York, "Masterpieces of American Jewelry," at the American Folk Art Museum (45 W. 53rd St.; www.folkartmuseum.org; through January 23), covers fashion history, from an 18th-century seascape watercolor on an ivory locket to a 1990's diamond bunny that Daniel Brush attached to a Bakelite bracelet. Many of the 150 baubles shown belonged to luminaries such as heiress Millicent Rogers (carved-jade string beans on a Jean Schlumberger brooch) and Jacqueline Onassis (gold cuffs by Van Cleef & Arpels). • At the Museum of Arts & Design (40 W. 53rd St.; www.americancraftmuseum.org; through January 2), "Seaman Schepps: A Century of New York Jewelry Design" celebrates the firm's outsized ornaments, collected by the likes of Andy Warhol, Doris Duke, and the Duchess of Windsor. Schepps, a first-generation American, developed his signature contrasts—chunky emerald or amethyst cabochons mixed with baroque river pearls and spidery pavé stones—during and just after the Great Depression. A monograph, co-authored by Schepps's granddaughter Amanda Vaill, accompanies the show ($65, Vendome). • "Cartier Design Viewed by Ettore Sottsass" is coming from Switzerland to the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (1001 Bissonnet St.; www.mfah.org; October 31-March 27). Sottsass, the versatile éminence grise of Italian design, selected 209 favorites from the Cartier Collection. Quartz snakes around gems of up to 152 carats on pieces made for maharajahs and moguls.
—Eve M. Kahn

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