Jessica Schwartzberg
David A. Keeps, Meeghan Truelove, Irene Edwards

Palm Springs (285 miles round-trip from Los Angeles)

A nouveau–Rat Pack oasis on the desert floor of California’s Coachella Valley, Palm Springs draws both the country-club set and the design-obsessed. But this resort town famed for its superlative vintage shops and classic architecture is also pleasantly rough around the edges: rocky landscapes, cactus forests, and alpine villages are all there to explore—if you can tear yourself away from that poolside chaise.

Lay of the Land

It’s a straight shot east on I-10 from Los Angeles to Palm Springs, past numbingly identical suburban shopping centers—but for a much richer experience, stop at the spots that most visitors whiz past. In Pomona, a half-hour outside L.A., a quick drive south off the Garey Avenue exit leads to the world-class American Museum of Ceramic Art and the pedestrian-only Antique Row on nearby Second Street.

Want to see pines as well as palms? Detour north from I-10 onto the panoramic Rim of the World Scenic Byway, which snakes up into the San Bernardino National Forest. In under an hour, you’ll arrive at the upscale mountain hamlet of Lake Arrowhead, where you can have lunch overlooking the water.

If your idea of shopping is bagging designer goods for less, then Cabazon, just off I-10, is sheer heaven. The highway-hugging Desert Hills Premium Outlets features 130 stores—from the usual mass-market brands to exclusive labels like Gucci, Etro, Prada, and Tod’s.

Farther ahead, giant silver energy-generating windmills appear on the horizon. To reach Palm Springs, follow U.S. 111, which morphs from a windy strip in the sand into tree-lined Palm Canyon Drive, where much of the best shopping is located. Put the top down and cruise a city rich in Midcentury Modern sights.

The areas outside Palm Springs—like legendary Joshua Tree National Park, about an hour away on rugged Twenty-Nine Palms Highway (CA-62)—are known for almost-lunar expanses. After a self-guided hike on one of the nature trails, end in Desert Hot Springs for a massage and a soak at one of the many thermal mineral-pool resorts. —David A. Keeps

 

Palm Springs Insider’s Guide

 

Where to Stay

The New Kid

Great Value The hippest hoteliers in Seattle have turned a once-basic motor lodge into the Ace Hotel & Swim Club (701 E. Palm Canyon Dr.; 877/223-5050 or 760/325-9900; acehotel.com; doubles from $99). The compound includes outdoor fireplaces, poolside yurts, and the darkly atmospheric Amigo Room, where the tables are covered in Mexican pesos.

For Romance

Great Value A 1930’s Spanish colonial spread built by an alleged mobster, the Colony Palms Hotel (572 N. Indian Canyon Dr.; 800/557-2187 or 760/969-1800; colonypalmshotel.com; doubles from $189) has an exceptional restaurant and a mansion-size pool.

Architectural Icon

Great Value Desert Modernist William Cody designed the low-slung 1952 Horizon Hotel (1050 E. Palm Canyon Dr.; 800/377-7855 or 760/323-1858; thehorizonhotel.com; doubles from $149) with glass walls to maximize the impressive mountain views.

Sinatra Style

Great Value After a $70 million renovation, the Riviera Resort & Spa (1600 N. Indian Canyon Dr.; 866/588-8311 or 760/327-8311; psriviera.com; doubles from $169) reopened with eye-popping Hollywood Regency-on-helium décor, including a bedazzled billiard table in the lobby. For quieter accommodations, book in Buildings 4 or 5.

Where to Eat & Drink

Lakeside View

The rustic-chic Bin189 (27984 Hwy. 189, Lake Arrowhead; 909/336-1551; lunch for two $40) has a hunting-lodge ambience and hearty dishes like Hungarian goulash and meat loaf.

Brunch Stop

The menu changes weekly at Cheeky’s (622 N. Palm Canyon Dr.; 760/327-7595; brunch for two $35), a mostly organic spot with vegetarian-friendly yam or persimmon sandwiches, five varieties of bacon, and killer blood-orange mimosas.

Smokin’ Section

This downtown lunch counter ain’t fancy, but it is authentic. At the Cowboy Way BBQ (317 N. Indian Canyon Dr.; 760/322-0265; lunch for two $25), rancher turned restaurateur Daniel Placencia dishes up tri-tip, brisket, pulled pork, and chicken with crunchy Kansas City coleslaw.

Cocktail Hour

Drinking alfresco will have you seeing stars in the cabanas at Dink’s Restaurant & Ultra Lounge (2080 N. Palm Canyon Dr.; 760/327-7676; drinks for two $24). The ambitious cocktail menu includes nine fruit-infused mojitos and a martini with muddled jalapeños (ouch!).

Casual Bite

Comfort food with a Continental touch (like filet-mignon chili and Florentine stuffed chicken) packs ’em in at Jake’s Ready to Eat (664 N. Palm Canyon Dr.; 760/327-4400; dinner for two $60).

What to See & Do

Hot Pots

An often overlooked gem, the American Museum of Ceramic Art (340 S. Garey Ave., Pomona; 909/865-3147; ceramicmuseum.org) showcases clay as an art form, from ancient vessels to contemporary works.

Prime Lookout

Bring a jacket—even in summer—to ride the Palm Springs Aerial Tramway (1 Tramway Rd.; 760/325-1391; pstramway.com) aboard the world’s largest rotating gondolas. The 2 1/2-mile, 10-minute trip up the sheer cliffs of Chino Canyon affords views of the Coachella Valley and the briny desert lake known as the Salton Sea.

Design Tour

Pick up free maps or a $5 guide to Midcentury buildings (by Albert Frey, Richard Neutra, and other masters) at the Palm Springs Historical Society (221 S. Palm Canyon Dr.; 760/323-8297; pshistoricalsociety.org).

Spa Day

Behind the Parker Palm Springs hotel’s decorative façade, the Palm Springs Yacht Club (4200 E. Palm Canyon Dr.; 760/770-5000; theparkerpalmsprings.com) offers full-on pampering. Arrive early to savor designer Jonathan Adler’s naughty nautical twist on Hollywood style.

Spotlight: Palm Springs Shopping

A mix of 20th-century galleries, consignment outlets, and eclectic boutiques makes this town a magnet for design fans. Here are eight stores not to miss.

1. House 849 Hide-covered ottomans, religious and Asian sculpture, even framed insect art: it’s a destination for designers of every stripe—particularly zebra stripe. 849 N. Palm Canyon Dr.; 760/325-7854; house849.com.

2. Modern Home Design Showroom Remodeling ideas for the Midcentury enthusiast. 2500 N. Palm Canyon Dr., suite B5-B; 760/320-8422; psmodhome.com.

3. Studio 111 Palm Springs Twentieth-century furniture alongside vintage tiles by famed sculptor Stan Bitters and contemporary pots by Josh Herman. 2675 N. Palm Canyon Dr.; 760/323-5104; studio111palmsprings.com.

4. Palm Canyon Galleria Arcade with 10 furniture and decorative-arts galleries, including Bon Vivant, a good place to score collectible Blenko glass and Raymor pottery. 457 N. Palm Canyon Dr.; 760/323-4576; palmspringsgalleria.com.

5. Trina Turk Residential Sister store to the fashion designer’s atelier for poolside couture. 895 N. Palm Canyon Dr.; 760/416-2856; trinaturk.com.

6. Modernway Palm Springs classics like glass and Lucite coffee tables and chrome-base sofas. 745 N. Palm Canyon Dr.; 760/320-5455; psmodernway.com.

7. Stewart Galleries Antiques and oddities—seashell-encrusted coquillage next to People’s Republic of China figurines—plus 20th-century paintings, from plein-air landscapes to Cubist canvases. 191 S. Indian Canyon Dr.; 760/325-0878; stewartgalleries.com.

8. Asylum Mod is god at this quirky establishment. 844 N. Palm Canyon Dr.; 760/864-1171; asylumhomestore.com.

The Route

Los Angeles to Pomona: 29 miles
Pomona to Cabazon: 76 miles
Cabazon to Palm Springs: 22 miles

 

Wine Country (259 miles round-trip from San Francisco)

 

Farm stands and family-run tasting rooms instead of faux châteaux: the word on Northern California’s Anderson Valley is that it’s what Napa used to be 30 years ago. The nearby town of Healdsburg acts as a sophisticated jumping-off point for this rural paradise, whose remote location and sleepy vibe are tempered by the buzz surrounding its wines. This is a destination tailor-made for the golden days of Indian summer.

Lay of the Land

Just across the Golden Gate Bridge from San Francisco, the Amalfi-like town of Sausalito harbors a worthy shopping stop—the Heath Ceramics Factory Store, known for iconic tableware that’s a favorite with modern-design fans and magazine prop stylists.

Heading north on Highway 101, the usual shopping strips alternate with stretches of bucolic farmland, dotted with ramshackle barns and black-and-white dairy cows. An hour north of Sausalito, Healdsburg has definitely been discovered—numerous restaurants, tasting rooms, and boutiques cluster around the historic plaza, where the Hotel Healdsburg holds court. Yet despite the recently acquired gloss, this remains a small town at heart. The restored Raven Theater presents everything from gospel concerts to the annual Mr. Healdsburg pageant, and the Saturday farmers’ market is one of the social highlights of the week.

Two-lane Highway 128, the main access to the Anderson Valley, twists and turns up a notorious set of steeply graded switchbacks, through rocky ridges and moss-covered oaks. Twenty or so miles later, you’ll emerge onto the valley floor in Boonville, the region’s largest town (all seven blocks of it). Snatches of Boontling, a dialect developed in the 1800’s, still persist—a reminder of the area’s quirky, somewhat insular nature.

The even smaller hamlet of Philo consists of a beloved Mexican restaurant, a tasting room for limited-edition Pinots, and Lemons’ Market, where Tom Lemons sells his own line-caught salmon.

At the valley’s northernmost edge, tiny Navarro feels like something out of a fairy tale: a village deep in the red-woods, with a river that runs to the sea. —Irene Edwards

 

Wine Country Insider’s Guide

 

Where to Stay

The Hub

Awash in sage and earth tones, Hotel Healdsburg (25 Matheson St., Healdsburg; 800/889-7188 or 707/431-2800; hotelhealdsburg.com; doubles from $380) has a lobby surrounded by a constant stream of activity, like jazz dinners and wine tastings. The spa treatments (especially the wine-and-organic-honey wrap) are sublime; the restaurant, Dry Creek Kitchen, is run by acclaimed chef Charlie Palmer, a hotel co-owner.

Minimalist Gem

A streamlined, vaguely Scandinavian aesthetic (Icelandic sheepskin rugs; polished concrete floors) rules in the six light-filled freestanding bungalows at the Duchamp Hotel (421 Foss St., Healdsburg; 800/431-9341 or 707/431-1300; duchamphotel.com; doubles from $350).

Pastoral Bliss

Great Value With just four cottages on 550 acres, it’s easy to find solitude at the Other Place (Boonville; 707/895-3979; sheepdung.com; cottages from $140), hidden more than a mile down an unpaved road. The décor is deliberately simple, all the better to let the scenery be the star.

Country Chic

Great Value Everything seems art-directed at the four-room Apple Farm (18501 Greenwood Rd., Philo; 707/895-2333; philoapplefarm.com; doubles from $175)—from the honor-system harvest stand to the arbor-shaded table for alfresco dinners. A homey breakfast of toast and the farm’s own addictive jam awaits each morning in the kitchen, the setting for weekend cooking classes ($625 per person).

Where to Eat & Drink

Salumi Central

Pig is something of an obsession at Bovolo Restaurant (106 Matheson St., Healdsburg; 707/431-2962; lunch for two $30), a petite café at the back of Copperfield’s Books. You can get the house-made bacon on a salad, in a sandwich, on pizza, or on pasta. Or throw dietary caution to the winds and dive into the pork-cheek sandwich.

The Splurge

A special-occasion meal in Sonoma County doesn’t get much more lavish than one at Cyrus (29 North St., Healdsburg; 707/433-3311; dinner for two $260), where chef Douglas Keane’s eight-course dinners are an unabashed love letter to foie gras, pork belly, and lobster.

Local Favorite

There might only be two entrées and a handful of starters on the menu at the Boonville Hotel (14050 Hwy. 128, Boonville; 707/895-2210; doubles from $125; dinner for two $72), but each dish captures the essence of the season. The duck comes from Sonoma and the fruit from the Apple Farm, and the greens are harvested in the garden. The 10 rooms are cheerful and unpretentious.

Morning Meal

As in a small-town version of Cheers, you’ll see the same faces reading the paper or tucking into a bowl of homemade granola at the friendly Mosswood Market & Café (1411 Hwy. 128, Boonville; 707/895-3635; breakfast for two $10).

Roadside Find

Fresh ingredients and a surprisingly good wine list set Libby’s (8651 Hwy. 128, Philo; 707/895-2646; dinner for two $28) apart from your average Mexican restaurant. The carnitas are excellent, but so is the Caesar salad: lightly dressed and sprinkled with crunchy tortilla strips.

Where to Shop

Eco Wear

The most fashion-forward boutique in town, Arboretum (332 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg; 707/433-7033; arboretumapparel.com) specializes in stylish, sustainable attire for men and women—from organic cotton T-shirts by Turk + Taylor to an Edun dress in sapphire silk.

Secondhand Scores

Vintage furnishings with an industrial-meets-schoolhouse bent (drafting tables, Thonet chairs) are arranged into photo-ready vignettes at 14feet (325 Center St., Healdsburg; 707/433-3391; 14feet.net).

Market Goods

A well-curated general store, Bates & Mailliard Farmhouse Mercantile (14111 Hwy. 128, Boonville; 707/895-3996) turns everyday items like Mason jars and balls of twine into exquisite collectibles.

The Route

San Francisco to Healdsburg: 70 miles
Healdsburg to Boonville: 45 miles
Boonville to Philo: 6 miles

Spotlight: Anderson Valley Wine Tour

Don’t let the aw-shucks, mom-and-pop atmosphere of these tasting rooms fool you—this region is a must for oenophiles in the know.

1. Standish Wine Co. The most photogenic tasting room in the valley, in a 19th-century wooden building once used for drying apples. 5101 Hwy. 128, Philo; 707/895-9213.

2. Breggo Cellars The name means “sheep” in Boontling—a nod to the property’s former life as one of the oldest sheep ranches in the region. 11001 Hwy. 128, Boonville; 707/895-9589; breggo.com.

3. Phillips Hill Estates Remarkable Pinots made by artist Toby Hill (grab his ’07 Marguerite—if you can get it). 8627 Hwy. 128, Philo; 707/895-2209; phillipshillestates.com.

4. Toulouse Vineyards Founded by retired fire captain Vern Boltz, this small, deceptively humble operation produces much-lauded wines and exceptional grapes. 8001 Hwy. 128, Philo; 707/895-2828.

5. Navarro Vineyards A popular draw for its affordable whites and outdoor picnic tables under trellised grapevines. 5601 Hwy. 128, Philo; 800/537-9463; navarrowine.com.

6. Husch Vineyards An Anderson Valley pioneer, housed in a charmingly rustic converted barn. 4400 Hwy. 128, Philo; 800/554-8724; huschvineyards.com.

7. Roederer Estate From the French makers of Cristal: sparkling wines at a much more budget-friendly price, in the valley’s poshest setting. 4501 Hwy. 128, Philo; 707/895-2288; roedererestate.com.

8. Esterlina Vineyards & Winery Located in the hills, with panoramic views. Tastings are accompanied by bowls of Goldfish and Cheetos—a savory (if irreverent) touch. 1200 Holmes Ranch Rd., Philo; 707/895-2920; esterlinavineyards.com; by appointment only.

Bonus: Beer Stop

Anderson Valley Brewing Co. Award-winning beers, plus seasonal releases (look for the Deep Enders Dark Porter). 17700 Hwy. 253, Boonville; 707/895-2337; avbc.com.

 

Puget Sound (198 miles round-trip from Seattle)

 

A string of interconnected waterways and islands, Washington’s Puget Sound provides instant access to the majestic side of the Pacific Northwest. Eagles and whales are frequent sights; on clear days, Mount Rainier, Mount Baker, and the Olympic Range add to the panoramic sweep of sea and sky. Thanks to numerous ferries and bridges, this looplike journey from Seattle through the forest-cloaked Olympic Peninsula is as easy as it is invigorating.

Lay of the Land

An affluent suburb that’s more like a wooded retreat, Bainbridge Island is a 35-minute ferry ride from Seattle. Country lanes dead-end at picturesque bays, and the streets near the ferry terminal are lined with cafés and boutiques.

Just north, on the Kitsap Peninsula, fluttering Norwegian flags trumpet Poulsbo’s Scandinavian roots. Tiny, landmarked Port Gamble is a pretty cluster of clapboard houses curled around the mouth of Gamble Bay.

Crossing over to the Olympic Peninsula, the road climbs through thick stands of western red cedar before descending into the valley hamlet of Sequim, which a quirk of geography has graced with a microclimate that’s sunnier than the often-rainy Pacific Northwest. The area is flush with lavender fields that may put you in mind of Provence. Three miles north, in the Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge, one of the world’s longest sandspits extends into the Strait of Juan de Fuca. A walking path wends along a beach strewn with tree-size driftwood to the still-functioning 1857 lighthouse.

To the west, Port Angeles, once the hub of a booming lumber industry, has a laid-back, no-nonsense vibe. It’s the primary gateway to Olympic National Park—which, at 922,000 acres, is bigger than Rhode Island. The park’s diversity is staggering: moss-draped rain forests, jagged cliffs, and glacier-capped peaks.

On the coast’s northeast tip, Port Townsend was a washed-up Victorian burg until an influx of artists kick-started its revival in the 1960’s. Now it’s a bed-and-breakfast mecca.

A ferry across Admiralty Inlet goes to Whidbey Island, home to the Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve (with its bird-filled lagoons) and the town of Langley, with its cosmopolitan restaurants and galleries. —Meeghan Truelove

 

Puget Sound Insider’s Guide

 

Where to Stay

Island Escape

Great Value A short walk from the Bainbridge Island ferry, the Eagle Harbor Inn (291 Madison Ave. S.; 206/842-1446; theeagleharborinn.com; doubles from $149) surrounds a small garden, with cozy interiors that feature overstuffed armchairs and Oriental rugs.

Back To Nature

Great Value There are no TV’s or phones to distract from the idyllic views at the Lake Crescent Lodge (416 Lake Crescent Rd., Olympic National Park; 360/928-3211; lakecrescentlodge.com; doubles from $105). Rooms in the converted 1916 tavern and Roosevelt cottages feel the most authentic, thanks to rustic birch furniture and pine-lined walls.

Cottage Charm

Great Value Decked out in cabbage-rose–patterned wallpaper and wicker chairs, the seven preppy-chic bungalows at Chevy Chase Beach Cabins (3710 S. Discovery Rd., Port Townsend; 360/385-1270; chevychasebeachcabins.com; doubles from $110) conjure a posh, grown-up summer camp—complete with croquet courts and horseshoe pit.

Where to Eat & Drink

King Crab

The mouthwatering signature sandwich at the Port Angeles CrabHouse (221 N. Lincoln, Port Angeles; 360/457-0424; lunch for two $35) combines Dungeness and Pacific meat on toasted sourdough. Bonus: an unironically retro interior with wraparound vistas of the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

Coffee Break

The perfect antidote to that Pacific Northwest drizzle: a just-pulled Borgia (a mocha laced with orange zest) with your morning eggs at Sweet Laurette’s Café & Bistro (1029 Lawrence St., Port Townsend; 360/385-4886; breakfast for two $30).

Locavore Feast

Chef Matt Costello of the Inn at Langley (400 First St., Langley, Whidbey Island; 360/221-3033; dinner for two $170) scours nearby farmers’ markets for his six-course prix fixe menus (Whidbey Island lamb loin; citrus-cured wild salmon), served Friday to Sunday. With only one seating a night, the meal can seem like a festive dinner party.

Pub Dining

Everyone from tattooed bikers to blue-haired old ladies slurps down the steamed Penn Cove mussels at funky Toby’s Tavern (8 N.W. Front St., Coupeville, Whidbey Island; 360/678-4222; lunch for two $25), which overlooks the waters where the famed bivalves are harvested.

What to See & Do

Garden Enclave

Lose yourself among the cultivated woodlands and manicured landscapes at the Bloedel Reserve (7571 N.E. Dolphin Dr., Bainbridge Island; 206/842-7631; reservations required), the sprawling former estate of a lumber baron turned passionate horticulturist.

Wild at Heart

Designated by Congress in 1938, mammoth and mountainous Olympic National Park (Visitors’ center at 3002 Mount Angeles Rd., Port Angeles; 360/565-3130; nps.gov) stretches across rugged Pacific coast and lush interior old-growth forests. Daylong explorations are surprisingly simple: in less than an hour, you can drive from Port Angeles to the Hurricane Hill Trail, a 3.2-mile ramble through subalpine meadows and groves, with heart-stopping views of peaks and nearby Vancouver Island.

Coastal Preserves

Three retired army bases are now popular state parks. Kayak through coves at Fort Worden (Port Townsend; 360/344-4400; rentals from $20 per hour), dig for littleneck clams along the shore at Fort Flagler (Marrowstone Island; 360/385-1259), or fly kites on the parade field at Fort Casey (Whidbey Island; 360/678-4519).

Best Boutiques

In downtown Port Townsend, whimsical Summer House Design (930 Water St., Port Townsend; 360/344-4192) stocks pétanque sets and handblown sake glasses. Artisans on Taylor (236 Taylor St., Port Townsend; 360/379-1029) has lathe-turned madrone-wood bowls. At the Wandering Wardrobe (936 Washington St., Port Townsend; 360/379-4691), score vintage handbags and Jackie O.–style suits.

The Route

Seattle to Bainbridge Island: 12 miles
Bainbridge Island to Sequim: 55 miles
Sequim to Port Angeles: 19 miles

Colony Palms Hotel

Originally established by Detroit mobster Al Wertheimer in 1936, this Spanish-Moroccan hotel has a former guest list that includes Frank Sinatra, Ronald Reagan, and Elizabeth Taylor. In 2007, the hotel reopened after a $16 million renovation led by renowned designer Martyn Lawrence-Bullard. The 56 guest rooms are decorated with red concrete floors, sisal rugs, and woven Suzani headboards, and some also include claw-foot tubs and fireplaces. Surrounded by lemon and palm trees, the central courtyard contains a Spanish-tiled swimming pool with views of the San Jacinto Mountains, as well as the flagship Purple Palm Restaurant which serves gourmet Mediterranean cuisine.

Bloedel Reserve

This 150-acre preserve at the northern tip of Bainbridge Island (35 minutes by ferry from Seattle) is a mix of pristine second-growth forest and meticulously landscaped gardens. The self-guided loop trail takes roughly two hours and leads you through a bird refuge that’s home to trumpeter swans, great blue herons, and kingfishers; across hand-hewed wooden bridges and through fern-choked forest; and into a Japanese garden where leaves fall gracefully among wooden gates. The path eventually ends at a grand mansion, the former private residence of the Bloedel family—prominent in the timber industry’s forest-conservation efforts during the 1940’s and 50’s.

Admission: $13 adults; $9 seniors; $5 student; Children under 13 are free. Closed Monday.

Anderson Valley Brewing

 Award-winning beers, plus seasonal releases (look for the Deep Enders Dark Porter).

Cyrus

Sonoma Valley dining doesn’t get any finer than it does here, at this two-Michelin-starred restaurant set in Healdsburg’s Hotel Le Mars. The dining room—where the vaulted ceilings glow with golden light and where natty servers proffer selections from the caviar cart, cheese cart, and truffle humidor—encourages dressing up; and the sublime multicourse tasting menus from chef Douglas Keane (formerly of Restaurant Gary Danko) invite lingering. Look for dishes like Wagyu strip loin with leeks and Japanese winter squash; roasted lobster in a tamarind-ponzu sauce; and pumpkin tagliarini with truffled Pecorino. And opt for the pairings, especially if the 750-plus labels on the wine list make you dizzy. Reservations are required.

Inn at Langley Restaurant

Chef Matt Costello scours nearby farmers’ markets for his six-course prix fixe menus (Whidbey Island lamb loin; citrus-cured wild salmon), served Friday to Sunday. With only one seating a night, the meal can seem like a festive dinner party.

Roederer Estate

From the French makers of Cristal: sparkling wines at a much more budget-friendly price, in the valley’s poshest setting.

Boonville Hotel

A modern roadhouse where each of the 10 colorful rooms features hillside views.

Philo Apple Farm

The folks at the Philo Apple Farm once owned the French Laundry; now they grow 80 varieties of apples and rent out four charming cottages. Everything seems art-directed at the four-room property—from the honor-system harvest stand to the arbor-shaded table for alfresco dinners. A homey breakfast of toast and the farm’s own addictive jam awaits each morning in the kitchen, the setting for weekend cooking classes ($625 per person).

Hotel Healdsburg

Healdsburg’s historic downtown got a big dose of modern chic when this hotel opened in 2002, right on the main square. The property has a sophisticated, W-ish aesthetic, with common areas (a cavernous, firelit lobby lounge, a glassed-in breakfast atrium, a sleek outdoor pool) that feel luxe and decidedly angular. The 55 guest rooms are more inviting, with sunny yellow walls, polished pecan floors, and teak furnishings warming up the otherwise spare décor (the goose-down duvets and Frette linens help, too). Celebrity chef Charlie Palmer runs the excellent on-site restaurant, Dry Creek Kitchen; be sure to nab a dinner reservation when you book your room. For a more hands-on experience, sign up for any of several one-day cooking classes at nearby Relish Culinary School—they run the gamut from pickling and cheesemaking to mushroom-foraging.

Duchamp Hotel, Healdsburg

Urbanites who prefer sleek, self-serve apartments to homey, antiques-filled B&Bs will appreciate the Duchamp, just two blocks off Healdsburg’s main plaza. The property’s six freestanding, metal-roofed bungalows are a study in clean-lined modernity, with poured concrete floors, flat-screen TVs, flokati rugs, and brushed-steel bathrooms. All have private patios facing onto a central, heated outdoor pool. You’ll find no staffers fussing over you here; apart from the specific hours when guests check in and breakfast is served, you’ll be left blissfully alone.

Room to Book: All six bungalows are identical, but Room 9, at the edge of the property overlooking a creek, offers the most privacy.

Insider Tip: Though not well known, the small, nearby Duchamp Estate winery (run by Peter and Pat Lenz, who also own the hotel) is worth visiting for its tasty, organic Syrah.

Horizon Hotel

The Palm Springs Modern architectural style owes its beginning to William F. Cody, and this low-profile hotel, built in 1952 for a Hollywood producer, is preserved as a tribute to his mid-century modern designs. Patios accompany the bungalows, which combine to make 22 guest rooms, from the Queen Standard to the 2,000-square-foot “Residence,” which has its own private pool. Platform beds, ample glass, and the occasional zebra print fill the interiors, and bathrooms are stocked with L’Occitane products. This adults-only property (age 21 and up) has a saline pool and offers room service from the adjacent diner.

Toby's Tavern

Everyone from tattooed bikers to blue-haired old ladies slurps down the steamed Penn Cove mussels at this funky no-frills restaurant, which overlooks the waters where the famed bivalves are harvested.

Trina Turk Residential

California-born designer Trina Turk opened this home furnishings store in 2008, next to the first location of her women’s and men’s fashion boutique. The one-story building, built in 1962 by desert modernist architect Albert Frey, sits on a wide street lined with palm trees. Inside, the white surfaces, bright lemon-yellow walls, and strong prints evoke the 1960's and 1970's—decades from which Turk draws inspiration. Mock rooms are outfitted with graphic-print pillows, napkins, and more made with Trina Turk's signature fabrics, as well as other designer goods, such as Missoni towels and Alice Supply Co's brightly colored gardening tools.

Standish Wine Company

Up the road in Philo, you can also visit the most photogenic tasting room in the valley, in a 19th-century wooden building once used for drying apples.

Lake Crescent Lodge

There are no TV’s or phones to distract from the idyllic views. Rooms in the converted 1916 tavern and Roosevelt cottages feel the most authentic, thanks to rustic birch furniture and pine-lined walls.

Fort Casey State Park

See the park's lighthouse and artillery units from the 1890s or fly kites on the parade field.

Eagle Harbor Inn

A short walk from the Bainbridge Island ferry, the inn surrounds a small garden, with cozy interiors that feature overstuffed armchairs and Oriental rugs. The rooms have cushy beds and sofas, and DVD players.

Ace Hotel & Swim Club

Riviera Resort & Spa

Stars like Elvis Presley, Bob Hope and Frank Sinatra lounged around the Riviera Resort and Spa in the 1960's. In 2008, renovations from a $70 million budget brought the legendary Palm Springs hotel back with retro Hollywood Glam. Retreat to one of 406 guest rooms, 44 luxury suites or 108 Mediterranean suites with marble bathrooms, exquisite linens and widescreen plasma TV's. Celebrity treatment includes the 12,000-square-foot SpaTerre, classic cocktails from the Bikini Bar, Circa 59's prix fixe menu, and the rejuvenating powers of this historic property.

Bin189

The name of this rustic restaurant and bar in the Lake Arrowhead Resort and Spa refers to its location along U.S. Highway 189. The bar has a sliced timber base and moose antler chandeliers. The adjacent dining room has white tablecloths and built-in wooden wine racks. After Easter, outdoor seating is available. Three meals are served daily, with breakfast favorites including eggs Benedict and cinnamon French toast filled with berries and mascarpone cheese. Lunch consists of globally inspired dishes such as popcorn chicken on baby greens with lychee nuts; the Miso-crusted Chilean sea bass is a dinner specialty.

Cheeky’s

Locals arrive early to avoid waiting in line for the famous brunch at popular Cheeky's in Palms Springs. The 20-seat restaurant, with an outdoor patio that doubles dining space, serves from a menu that changes weekly. Chef Tara Lazar insists on fresh, seasonal ingredients, preferably local and organic. Great care and enthusiasm go into the food she prepares, which often reflects a Mexican influence from her childhood. Cheeky's takes no shortcuts, does not use mixes, and juices are squeezed by hand. Try an extraordinary persimmon sandwich or five varieties of bacon served as a flight.

Cowboy Way BBQ

Rancher-turned-restaurateur Daniel Placencia dishes up trophy winning chili with chunks of pork and a fiery, thick sauce. Cowboy Way in Palm Springs serves fall-off-the-bone pulled pork, baby back ribs, tri-tip, and chicken with crunchy Kansas City coleslaw, too. All sandwiches come with a choice of cornbread, potato salad, ranch beans, slaw, or macaroni salad. The dining room is home to both a small bar and well-spaced tables with fake cow fur tablecloths, and the restaurant boasts its own giant smokerwhich Placencia insists is s the key to preparing great BBQ and uses only red oak and hickory wood.

Dink’s Restaurant & Ultra Lounge

Drinking alfresco will have you seeing stars in the cabanas. The ambitious cocktail menu includes nine fruit-infused mojitos and a martini with muddled jalapeños (ouch!).

Jake’s Ready to Eat

Christopher Malm and Bruce Bloch named their American bistro Jake’s after their West Highland Terrier. Located in the Uptown Design District, this eatery’s dining room is bright with glossy white walls and beige banquette seating. It specializes in sandwiches and salads at lunch, including a pulled pork sandwich with spicy cole slaw and a seared ahi tuna wrap with ponzu vinaigrette. At dinner, menu options include meatloaf with truffle mac and cheese, and roasted salmon with herbed crème fraiche. Weekend brunch is popular and fills up quickly, so reservations are recommended.

American Museum of Ceramic Art

This overlooked gem of a museum showcases clay as an art form, from ancient vessels to contemporary works.

Palm Springs Aerial Tramway

Palm Springs Historical Society

John McCallum, the first permanent white settle of Palm Springs, had an adobe house built for him in 1884, and along with Miss Cornelia White’s “Little House,” it makes up the museums of this nonprofit started by Melba Berry Bennett in 1955. Inside the adobe, browse through the historic items that include Native American artifacts, tools, and pictures. The “Little House” is also full of antiques and was built in 1893 with wood from an old railroad. Events are often held here, and tours and memberships are available.

House 849

High-end furnishings, home accessories, and art befitting a variety of styles from vintage to contemporary are stocked inside House 849 on North Palm Canyon Drive. Both the physical and online stores carry a rotating selection of inventory that has included Majolica urns, Chinese scholar chairs, vintage tea carts, and bronze sculptur. Furniture ranges from an ornately carved oak cabinet with arched double doors and claw feet to a cream-and-gilt Italian secretary, even a wood root desk that looks as if it had been grown in a forest. 

Modern Home Design Showroom

Modern Home Commercial & Residential Design Showroom on North Palm Canyon Drive sells building and furnishing materials that have the mid-20th-century look of simple lines and curves. Geared toward both builders and remodelers, the showroom also carries vintage and modern items alongside the mid-century ones. Unique products include quartz and recycled-glass countertops, sculptured paneling, bamboo flooring, grasscloth wallcoverings, Architectural Pottery™ in geometric forms, and clocks that are brushed stainless steel and flush-mounted, with only the numbers and hands on the wall.

Studio 111 Palm Springs

A wall of windows runs across the front of a low-profile white building in North Palm Springs, and a contrasting red wall to the left bears the distinctive store logo. This small design shop, owned by Bob Fisher and David Limburger, focuses on selling 20th-century art, but modern pieces are also availblel (like a quirky Decoratum bench made with over 1,500 pink pencils). The store also offers antique furniture pieces, such as a set of mahogany console tables from 1810 and a French bouillotte lamp from Herringbone Home.

Palm Canyon Galleria

Along the flagstone hall of this mall-style layout are several shops that carry numerous mid-century and vintage items. The Palm Canyon Galleria on North Palm Canyon Drive consists of its namesake shop plus Bon Vivant with its vintage glass and jewelry, Mr. Cox with its vintage clothing, and seven other shops like Froelick Gallery, Griffin, and more. Their inventory has included Blenko glass, vintage Tiffany jewelry, Bakelite pieces, Murano and Ikebana vases, Marbro lamps, Raymor pottery, a Bjorn Windblad porcelain bowl, and art by Palm Springs artists. Regular hours are Thursday through Monday.

Modernway

The plate-glass windows beneath the blue-edged roof give a preview of the high-end 1950s furnishings for which Modernway (and Palm Springs) is known. The store’s mid-century classics span furniture, accessories, lighting, and art. Examples of the vintage treasures that Modernway has carried in the past are Lucite tables and bar stools, a Vittorio Introini leather and chrome-plated seating set, Warren Platner for Knoll lounge chairs, Eames shell chairs, Robert Sonneman lamps, Seguso bookends and bowls, and Woodard Sculptura and Barwa outdoor furniture – whatever is needed to outfit a home Rat-Pack style.

Stewart Galleries

Fans of antiques and American Impressionist art should include Stewart Galleries on their list of stops in Palm Springs. Located in the La Plaza District at Arenas Road and South Indian Canyon Drive, Stewart Galleries carries fine art ranging from plein-air Western and coastal landscapes by California painters to Cubist and Surrealist canvases. The many artists include Carl Schmidt, Carl Bray, Robert Knipschild, and C.A.S. Mitchell. The gallery’s broad inventory is frequently updated and in addition to fine art has stocked English Majolica, antique lamps, painted and wooden furniture, estate items, and more.

Asylum, Palm Springs

Mod is god at this quirky establishment.

Heath Ceramics Factory Store

Known for iconic tableware that’s a favorite with modern-design fans and magazine prop stylists.

Lemons’ Market

Tom Lemons sells his own line-caught salmon.

Other Place

With just four cottages on 550 acres, it’s easy to find solitude at the Other Place, hidden more than a mile down an unpaved road. The décor is deliberately simple, all the better to let the scenery be the star.

Bovolo Restaurant

Pig is something of an obsession at this petite café at the back of Copperfield’s Books. You can get the house-made bacon on a salad, in a sandwich, on pizza, or on pasta. Or throw dietary caution to the winds and dive into the pork-cheek sandwich.

Mosswood Market & Café

As in a small-town version of Cheers, you’ll see the same faces reading the paper or tucking into a bowl of homemade granola.

Libby’s

Fresh ingredients and a surprisingly good wine list set Libby's apart from your average Mexican restaurant. The carnitas are excellent, but so is the Caesar salad: lightly dressed and sprinkled with crunchy tortilla strips.

Arboretum

The most fashion-forward boutique in town specializes in stylish, sustainable attire for men and women—from organic cotton T-shirts by Turk + Taylor to an Edun dress in sapphire silk.

14feet

Vintage furnishings with an industrial-meets-schoolhouse bent (drafting tables, Thonet chairs) are arranged into photo-ready vignettes.

Bates & Mailliard Farmhouse Mercantile

This well-curated general store turns everyday items like Mason jars and balls of twine into exquisite collectibles.

Breggo Cellars

The name means “sheep” in Boontling—a nod to the property’s former life as one of the oldest sheep ranches in the region.

Phillips Hill Estates Winery

Remarkable Pinots made by artist Toby Hill (grab his ’07 Marguerite—if you can get it).

Toulouse Vineyards

Founded by retired fire captain Vern Boltz, this small, deceptively humble operation produces much-lauded wines and exceptional grapes.

Navarro Vineyards & Winery

A popular draw for its affordable whites and outdoor picnic tables under trellised grapevines.

Husch Vineyards

An Anderson Valley pioneer, housed in a charmingly rustic converted barn.

Esterlina Vineyards & Winery

Located in the hills, with panoramic views. Tastings are accompanied by bowls of Goldfish and Cheetos—a savory (if irreverent) touch.

By appointment only.

Chevy Chase Beach Cabins

Decked out in cabbage-rose–patterned wallpaper and wicker chairs, the seven preppy-chic bungalows conjure a posh, grown-up summer camp—complete with croquet courts and horseshoe pit.

Port Angeles CrabHouse

The mouthwatering signature sandwich combines Dungeness and Pacific meat on toasted sourdough. Bonus: an unironically retro interior with wraparound vistas of the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

Sweet Laurette’s Café & Bistro

The perfect antidote to that Pacific Northwest drizzle: a just-pulled Borgia (a mocha laced with orange zest) with your morning eggs.

Olympic National Park

Designated by Congress in 1938, mammoth and mountainous park stretches across rugged Pacific coast and lush interior old-growth forests. Daylong explorations are surprisingly simple: in less than an hour, you can drive from Port Angeles to the Hurricane Hill Trail, a 3.2-mile ramble through subalpine meadows and groves, with heart-stopping views of peaks and nearby Vancouver Island.

Fort Worden

Located along Admiralty Inlet, this 433-acre stretch of land once served as an active army installation and then a juvenile detention facility before opening to the public as a park in 1973. There is still evidence of the park’s military roots with abandoned bunkers and a Coast Artillery Museum, but it’s the beaches and bluffs that draw day trippers and kayakers to this Olympic Peninsula park. Fort Worden may also look familiar to film buffs – the 1982 movie, An Officer and a Gentleman was filmed here. 

Fort Flagler

Dig for littleneck clams along the shore of this retired army base.

Summer House Design

This whimsical shop stocks pétanque sets and handblown sake glasses.

Artisans on Taylor

Five years ago, Anna Nasset-Glenn took over ownership of this artisan boutique and longtime Port Townsend institution, where she helps customers find the perfect sparkling bauble or piece of locally made art. Sleek glass cases display found art dioramas and jewelry by Pacific Northwest artists like Amy Bixby, while walls are lined with paintings that rotate monthly. Small collections of clothing and accessories made by Seattle designers are also available. The gallery frequently hosts book signings and artist openings as well. 

Wandering Wardrobe

This vintage boutique and consignment shop in downtown is jam-packed with secondhand deals. The owners scour estate sales, attics, and garage sales for everything from vintage wedding dresses to hard-to-find haute couture pieces. The shop has both men and women’s clothing organized by decade from the 1920’s to the 1980’s, along with a decent selection of shoes, sunglasses, and handbags. Frequent fashion shows have quirky themes like wearable art or Hawaiian fashion, and the staff can help pull together an outfit for a specific period or look.

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